What if I Cannot Find the Party I Want to Sue?

Last updated on September 11, 2018

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In general, you will need to know the location of the party you are suing to start a lawsuit against that party.  This article explains how you can find the party to be sued, and your options if you are unable to do so.

Why Do You Need to Know the Location of the Party to be Sued?

To start a lawsuit in Singapore, the originating process (i.e. the court document used to start the lawsuit, such as a writ of summons) must generally be served personally on the party you are suing.  This ensures that the lawsuit is brought to the party’s attention.

Personal service is effected by leaving a physical copy of the originating process with the party being sued.

If the party is a body corporate (e.g. a company), personal service is effected by:

  1. Leaving the originating process at its registered office (if any);
  2. Sending the originating process by registered post to its registered office (if any); or
  3. Personal service of the originating process on the chairman, secretary, treasurer or other similar officers of the body corporate.

How Can I Find the Party to Effect Personal Service?

If you do not already know the location of the party to be sued, you can try obtaining the residential address, workplace address and/or registered office address of the party (whichever is relevant) by performing searches with the:

What If I Still Cannot Find the Party?

If you have made at least 2 reasonable attempts at personal service but have still been unsuccessful at locating the party to be sued, you can consider applying to the Court for substituted service of the originating process.

Substituted service does not require a physical act of delivery. Rather, it involves taking certain steps ordered by the Court to bring the originating process to the attention of the other party to be sued.

When will the Court allow substituted service?

The Court may allow substituted service if it finds that personal service is for any reason “impracticable”. Generally, you would need to show the Court that:

  • Your proposed mode of substituted service will probably be effective in bringing the originating process to the attention of the party to be sued; and
  • You have made 2 reasonable but unsuccessful attempts at personal service on the party before filing the application for substituted service.

What are the modes of substituted service available?

The Court may order one or more of the modes of substituted service below:

  • Posting on the party’s front door: Posting a copy of the originating process on the front door of the last-known address of the party to be sued.
  • Registered post: Sending a copy of the originating process to the last-known address of the party to be sued using Advice of Receipt registered post.
  • Electronic means: Sending a copy of the originating process to the party through “electronic means”. Electronic means of service which have been accepted by the Singapore Courts include email, Skype, Facebook, internet message boards, WhatsApp and other smartphone messaging platforms. You will need to show the Court that the account to which the originating process will be sent belongs to the party to be sued and is currently active.
  • Advertisement: Placing an advertisement in a daily newspaper circulating in Singapore in a language the party to be sued can understand.  Service by advertisement should be considered only as a last resort.

In cases where you are unable to locate the party and/or do not know the party’s address, applying to the Court for substituted service of the originating process by electronic means or advertisement may be your best option.

What If the Party to be Sued is Currently Overseas?

If the party to be sued is currently overseas, the options available to you will depend on whether the party is:

  • Based overseas; or
  • Based in Singapore but is temporarily overseas.

Party to be sued is based overseas

If the party to be sued is based overseas (for example, you are suing a foreigner), you will first need to apply to the Singapore Courts for permission to serve the originating process on the party out of jurisdiction.

The Singapore Courts will permit service of the originating process out of jurisdiction if the claim is a “proper” one for service out of jurisdiction.  The claim will likely be a proper one if the following criteria is satisfied:

    • A claim where relief is sought against a party who is domiciled, ordinarily resident or carrying on business or who has property in Singapore;
    • A claim seeking an injunction ordering a party to do or refrain from doing anything in Singapore; and
    • A claim brought in respect of a breach committed in Singapore of a contract made in Singapore.
  • There is a serious issue to be tried on the merits; and
  • Singapore is a proper forum to try the claim.

If the Singapore Courts grant permission for you to serve the originating process out of jurisdiction, service has to be effected in accordance with the law of the foreign country in which the party to be sued is located.

If you are unable to locate the party in the foreign country to effect personal service, you can apply to the Singapore Courts for substituted service out of jurisdiction on the party.

For example, the Singapore Courts have permitted substituted service of an originating process on a man based in Australia using Skype, Facebook and internet messaging boards, after multiple attempts at personal service at the man’s address in Australia failed.

The same requirements and modes for substituted service described above apply. However, the method(s) of substituted service adopted must not go against the law of the foreign country in which service is to take place.

Party to be sued is based in Singapore but is temporarily overseas

If the party is based in Singapore but is overseas at the time the originating process is issued, and you are unable to locate that party, the Singapore Courts may permit substituted service of the originating process on the party within Singapore.

The same requirements and modes of substituted service described above will apply. You also will not have to apply to serve the originating process out of jurisdiction.

For example, the Singapore Courts have permitted substituted service of an originating process within Singapore on a merchant who had left Singapore and was travelling through various countries for business. Because the merchant kept regular contact with his family at his Singapore address, the Court allowed the originating process to be posted on the front door of that Singapore address.

Before making a claim
  1. Differences between Criminal Law and Civil Law
  2. Limitation Periods Limiting the Right to Sue: the Limitation Act in Singapore
  3. Mediation in Singapore
  4. Arbitration and Mediation: When They Can be Useful for Business Disputes
  5. 6 Things You Need to Know about Third-Party Funding in International Arbitration
  6. Can I Sue a Foreigner in Singapore?
  7. Should You Sue? 8 Things to Think About Before Suing
  8. What to Do If Someone Sues Your Singapore Business
  9. Arbitration: When and How to Arbitrate Business Disputes in Singapore
Making a claim - the beginning of a dispute
  1. Law on Writ of Summons in Singapore
  2. Engaging a Queen’s Counsel in Singapore
  3. Letters of Demand and Their Usages in Singapore
  4. How Do I Make a Small Claim in the Small Claims Tribunals in Singapore?
  5. Security of Payment Act: Claiming Progress Payments for Construction Work Done
  6. Negotiating a Settlement in a Business Dispute
  7. What if I Cannot Find the Party I Want to Sue?
  8. First Meeting With Your Business Dispute Lawyer: What to Expect
  9. Received a "Without Prejudice" Letter? Here’s What It Means
The Litigation Process
  1. Admissibility of Evidence in the Singapore Courts
  2. Civil Litigation in Singapore
  3. Gag orders – the law in Singapore
  4. Default Judgments and Summary Judgments in Singapore
  5. Memorandum of Appearance in Singapore: What It is and How to File
  6. After the Lawsuit: Who Has to Pay Whom, and How Much?
  7. Affidavits in Singapore: What are They, How to Prepare One and What Happens After That
  8. How to Get a Writ of Seizure and Sale to Enforce a Judgment
  9. Subpoenaed to be a Court Witness in Singapore: What You Need to Do
  10. Who is an Expert Witness and How to Use Expert Evidence in Singapore
Remedies available
  1. Types of Injunctions in Singapore
  2. Specific Performance: Obtaining this Equitable Remedy in Singapore